Not cleaning dryer vent could be a fire hazard

Not cleaning dryer vent could be a fire hazard

Every year, thousands of house fires are started by a clothes dryer. According to the National Fire Protection Association, nearly 15,000 house fires are started every year by a dryer, but it can be easily avoided. “If you don’t clean the vents out naturally we’re not getting air circulation,” said Cohen’s sale manger Michael Cohen. […]

Every year, thousands of house fires are started by a clothes dryer.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, nearly 15,000 house fires are started every year by a dryer, but it can be easily avoided.

“If you don’t clean the vents out naturally we’re not getting air circulation,” said Cohen’s sale manger Michael Cohen.

That lack of air circulation can create a dangerous scenario.

“If you don’t clean it out, then it just gets more and more clogged. It traps heat inside and it doesn’t release the heat as well out through the duct work which becomes hotter inside the dryer which could eventually char and ignite the items inside,” said Montgomery Fire Department Lt. Jason Cupps.

Officials recommend you clean the lint trap in your dryer after every use, and that you clean out the entire duct system at least once a year.

“You have two dryer vents. One dryer vent would naturally be in your dryer and you should do that after every load that you dry, but then you also have a vent that goes in the wall a lot of the houses,” said Cohen.

If your dryer doesn’t dry like it used to, or if there’s a burning smell near the dryer, it’s time to call a professional.

“In the wall, if you have lint that gets stuck in the vent you know that is where you can have a fire hazard because you’ve got all this heat and then you have all this dry lent and it’s just waiting to catch on fire,” said Cohen.

There are some do it yourself cleaning kids that you can buy at the store, but Cohen said it’s best to leave it up to the pros.

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Get By A Li’l Easier With These Genius Soda Can Hacks

Whether you call it “pop,” “soda,” or “coke,” all soft drink consumers have one thing in common. Once you’ve downed your fizzy beverage of choice, you likely throw the aluminum can away or smash it against your forehead and then throw it away. But you might want to rethink that… With a little bit of […]

Whether you call it “pop,” “soda,” or “coke,” all soft drink consumers have one thing in common. Once you’ve downed your fizzy beverage of choice, you likely throw the aluminum can away or smash it against your forehead and then throw it away. But you might want to rethink that…

With a little bit of creativity, soda cans can be repurposed to make your life just a little bit easier. So grab a can and pop the top, but don’t toss it just yet: these DIY soda can hacks might stop you from ever getting rid of your cans again!

1. Who says old metal cans aren’t eco-friendly? An empty Coke, with some bark and moss glued on, can serve as the perfect home for wrens or other small birds. Just attach the birdhouse to any tree using a couple of zip ties.

2. Got your scissors handy? With a bit of cutting, you can transform any aluminum can into the perfect holder for a tea light. This homemade lamp provides some great mood lighting!

3. Need to inject a little more life into your party? If you have some spare time beforehand, you can build an awesome speaker using a soda can and a handful of audio parts. This project should cost you less than $20, which is a steal compared to brand-name speakers.

4. Just because your microwave is on the fritz doesn’t mean that movie night is ruined. You can have fresh popcorn in seconds by putting together a makeshift oven out of two cans and a small candle. Pour in some kernels, and soon you’ll feel like you’ve got your very own movie theater!

5. If you happen to have a ton of soda can tabs on your hands, you can make a very cool, lightweight chain. After cutting a slit in the thinnest side of the tabs, you can stack them to make an individual link, and then hook them up with other links. Soon, you’ll have a shiny chain perfect for a wallet or belt.

6. When it comes to storing your valuables, a safe is often too impractical and too obvious. For a subtler method, simply use a can opener to slice off the top of an empty can, and then add a bit of weight inside. Voila! You’ve got the perfect place to secretly stash any small objects in plain sight.

7. Need to split apart a yolk from the egg whites? Sure, you could blow some of your hard-earned cash on a kitchen gadget you’ll only use once in a while. But for a cheaper solution, cut off the top of the can and drill some holes in the bottom. Once it’s flipped over, the gadget will do the job perfectly.

8. Speaking of eggs, what do you do with your dirty frying pan? Pouring leftover grease down the drain seems like an easy fix, but it’s actually a great way to clog your pipes with fat. Instead of dealing with that nightmare, just pour the waste into a can and dispose of it once it cools.

9. Do you hate buying small pots for seedlings when they’ll just outgrow their home in a couple weeks? You can have a green thumb AND keep the green in your wallet. Slice an empty can in half and fill each part with soil, and you’ve got cheap and easy planters for your next crop.

10. A lot of the phone cases out there are so bulky that you can barely fit the device in your pocket. For a slimmer profile, you can take the body of an aluminum can and wrap it around like a suit of armor. Just remember to leave a hole for your camera, or else you’ll never become an Instagram star!

These DIY hacks show why it always helps to have a couple of soda cans on hand.

Share these helpful tips with your friends!

 

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Xiaomi Has Released A Compact Device For Quality Cleaning Of Furniture

Xiaomi company has released a device for deep cleaning of upholstered furniture. This compact device effectively removes impurities. It is reported prostotech.com. On a single battery cleaner runs up to 45 minutes. It can penetrate all layers of upholstered furniture. The cleaning can be performed by using warm air, or UV radiation. So the stains […]

Xiaomi company has released a device for deep cleaning of upholstered furniture. This compact device effectively removes impurities.

It is reported prostotech.com.

On a single battery cleaner runs up to 45 minutes. It can penetrate all layers of upholstered furniture. The cleaning can be performed by using warm air, or UV radiation. So the stains are removed as quickly as possible.

Using led lamps purifier identificeret all types of dirt, stains, hair, dust and the like.

The device can operate in several modes: standard, maximum and hot. The last mode is designed to remove wet spots.

The cost of this purifier from Xiaomi is 3,360 USD.

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Use a lint roller to dust lamp shades and a can of Coke for a sparkling toilet: Savvy homeowners share the tricks they use to spring clean in MINUTES

Spring cleaning can be an laborious task, especially if chores have mounted up There are some simple, yet effective hacks, guaranteed to make the job easy These include making good use of the dishwasher and keeping a lint roller handy The days are getting brighter which means it’s the perfect time to lavish a little […]

Spring cleaning can be an laborious task, especially if chores have mounted up
There are some simple, yet effective hacks, guaranteed to make the job easy
These include making good use of the dishwasher and keeping a lint roller handy

The days are getting brighter which means it’s the perfect time to lavish a little extra love on your home.

And while there’s nothing more satisfying than a sparkling clean and well-organised space, the list of chores can seem endless.

If you’re like most and have little time, those with a knack for cleaning have revealed a few of their best spring cleaning hacks, including the little known-trick of using a can of Coke to clean the cistern.

1. Make good use of the dishwasher
Loading up the dishwasher is one of the easiest ways to clean a few extra items without the need for more elbow grease.

According to Popsugar, the dishwasher can be used to clean a raft of other household goods including refrigerator shelves, light switch plates and even the shower-head, if it is a removable type.

The publication also lists hair brushes, pet toys and sponges. Children’s toys can also benefit from being run through a wash cycle.

2. Use a lint roller for dusting

Dusting can be one of those tasks that leaves as much mess as it takes away.

So, to make the job easier, especially when dealing with tricky surfaces such as lamp shades or fabric surfaces, use a lint roller.

Lint rollers are also great for cleaning inside drawers, and in particular kitchen drawers, which are a magnet for dust and crumbs.

If the roller itself is proving to tricky to use, simply peel off a sheet of paper and press into hard-to-reach corners.

3. Quickly deodorise a mattress with bi-carb soda

There’s nothing better than taking your mattress out into the sun to air after months of cold and wet weather.

And while fresh air is optimal, there’s another way to do this, and there’s no heavy lifting involved.

Simply sprinkle baking soda all over your mattress and leave for an hour (leave for longer if you have more time).

Then vacuum up the excess bi-carb soda to reveal a freshly deodorised mattress.

4. Iron out carpet stains

Removing stains from carpet can be a time consuming, not to mention expensive, exercise.

One trick is to use a cloth or flannel soaked in water which has then been placed over the top of a stain before running an iron over this section of carpet.

It understood the hack works by allowing heat and steam from the cloth and iron to release trapped dirt from the fibres of carpets.

A test patch is recommended first.

5. Freshen up the microwave with vinegar

Constantly reheating food can leave the microwave in desperate need of freshening up.

A simple and effective way to ‘steam’ your microwave is to place cut lemons, cider vinegar and water in a microwaveable bowl before placing the bowl on full power in your microwave for several minutes.

Leave the bowl to steam inside your microwave for up to ten minutes to remove any odours before wiping away stains.

6. Furniture polish for stainless steel surfaces

If you have stainless steel appliances, and like these to look extra shiny, there’s an easy way to do this, and it doesn’t take hours.

According to some cleaning experts, furniture polish does the trick, and in no time at all.

Those who’ve tried the hack recommend using Pledge and a microfibre cloth for best results.

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Sucking CO2 out of the atmosphere, explained

Climate change has backed us into a corner. Scientists say we have remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The best time to start the fight against climate change was 20 years ago. The second best time is right now. And since we’re so far behind, we have no option other than to try to roll […]

Climate change has backed us into a corner. Scientists say we have remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

The best time to start the fight against climate change was 20 years ago. The second best time is right now. And since we’re so far behind, we have no option other than to try to roll the clock back and clean up the mess we’ve made.

In its most recent assessment, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported that we may have as little as 12 years to cut our greenhouse gas emissions in half compared to today’s levels to limit average global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, a benchmark to avoid some of the worst impacts of climate change. It also reports that every scenario for doing this requires pulling carbon dioxide out of the air, also known as “negative emissions.”

The low-end IPCC estimate requires pulling 100 gigatons of carbon dioxide removal by 2100, roughly double the amount that humanity produces in a year today. The high-end estimate is 1,000 gigatons, effectively forcing humanity to undo 20 years of global greenhouse gas emissions.

Either way, it means that carbon removal is no longer just a potential strategy for fighting climate change. Given the very high likelihood we will overshoot our emissions reduction targets, carbon removal is now an absolute necessity for avoiding worst-case scenarios.

The good news is we already know how to bring carbon back down to earth, from smart land management to high-tech plants that capturing it straight from the air. In fact, nature already soaks up almost one-third of the carbon dioxide we emit.

The big question is how we can ramp up everything we have to a meaningful scale in time.

Just in time, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine put out a new report Wednesday on the state of carbon dioxide removal technologies. The report found that we already have four methods ready for large-scale deployment at a cost of $100 per ton of carbon dioxide or less. Going forward, the report argues, the US needs more testing of these existing options and to ramp up research into new ways to capture carbon.

However, it notes, the world likely won’t be able to remove enough carbon dioxide with these technologies alone to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

This is a field full of jargon, and there’s confusion around when you can count carbon as truly “removed” or “negative.” To wit: “Carbon capture” typically refers to grabbing the carbon as it’s being emitted, like the flue gas of a coal power plant. “Carbon removal” usually means getting carbon dioxide after it has already reached the atmosphere. And there isn’t enough beer or soda in the world to use all those bubbles, so the captured carbon has to find new uses or get stored away forever.

The tools we have to manage carbon this way have their own benefits and tradeoffs. But they are all in their infancy and need to grow up quickly if we’re going to avert catastrophic warming of the planet. Here’s the lay of the land.

We can tweak the carbon cycle to reduce emissions
Nature has already covered the planet in solar-powered carbon dioxide absorbers, and they’ve been removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere for millennia.

Using sunlight, plants and microorganisms take in carbon dioxide and emit oxygen. Those plants are then eaten by animals, who then convert the plants to energy and exhale carbon dioxide. Or if the plants don’t get eaten, they die and decay, putting some carbon in the soil and returning some carbon to the atmosphere.

It’s almost a closed loop, though over the course of millions of years, enough decaying plant and animal matter gradually built up in the ground to yield vast reserves of fossil fuels while reducing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere bit by bit.

Humans have breached this cycle by digging up fossil fuels and burning them, leading to carbon dioxide building up in the atmosphere faster than natural systems can soak it up. This has led to a net increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, causing the planet to heat up.

Understanding this helps us frame our options for fighting climate change. If all you do is recirculate carbon dioxide in the air, you’re carbon neutral. But if you pull it out of the air and keep it from going back, you’re carbon negative.

Carbon dioxide removal should start with planting forests, grasses, crops, and better land management
One of the most powerful tools in fighting climate change is beneath our feet. Woodlands, prairies, algae, mangroves, wetlands, and soil withdraw carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and keep it from going back, tipping the balance negative.

Every acre of restored temperate forest can sequester 3 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. In the US, forests already offset about 13 percent of the country’s carbon emissions. Globally, forests absorb 30 percent of humanity’s emissions. So restoring forests can be an effective way to reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air.

Similarly, crops grown for human consumption like grains and grasses can also lead to negative emissions. These plants move atmospheric carbon dioxide into their root systems, so even if they’re eaten or burned for fuel, they leave some carbon in the soil. But the balancing act is trickier, since crops also require energy inputs like fertilizer and harvesting equipment. Clearing land to grow crops can also have a positive greenhouse gas footprint.

Another approach is to use holistic grazing practices for livestock. Rather than penning up these animals in factory farms, allowing them to graze over wider pastures can help restore grasslands as cattle, sheep, and pigs aerate the soil and enrich it with manure. The restored grasses then take in more carbon dioxide and store it in the soil.

These methods to fight climate change are often overshadowed by technological options, but they’re where we have the most experience and the best results so far. Restoring nature and planting more crops are also often cheaper than building and deploying hardware.

And, according to the new National Academies report, of the four CDR technologies that are ready for deployment, three involve the natural carbon cycle: planting new forests, improving forest management, and storing carbon in agricultural soils.

The big problem with these strategies is that there are tight constraints on how we use land. Forests, food, and housing needs compete for the same real estate, and there is not enough viable land to grow enough plants to completely offset all of humanity’s carbon dioxide emissions.

It’s also difficult to value the climate benefits of pristine or restored ecosystems against more measurable economic upsides like building housing or mining for resources.

We can produce power with negative emissions using bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration
Another option lies in growing crops that can be burned for fuel. Since their carbon came from the atmosphere rather than from underground reservoirs, biofuels can in theory be carbon neutral, or close to it.

But if you capture and sequester the greenhouse gases from a bioenergy plant, you can make the whole system carbon negative while also making heat, electricity, and fuels. The more crops you plant, burn, and sequester, the more carbon dioxide you remove from the air. That’s the logic behind bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS).

This has the added benefit of producing something you can sell to pay for the system. However, the same constraints that apply to afforestation also apply here. To limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius using BECCS, one estimate found that it would require biomass planted over an area larger than India.

And fighting climate change with BECCS requires producers to be very picky about their biomass sources. If you cut down an old tree to burn and replace it with a sapling, it will take years before the new plant will be able to absorb the same amount of carbon dioxide as its predecessor. This limits the kinds trees, crops, and grasses that can be used sustainably for BECCS.

Direct air capture of carbon dioxide is already underway
While carbon dioxide levels are at their highest levels in recorded history, the concentration is just 410 parts per million, about 0.04 percent of the atmosphere.

That means that building a machine to scrub carbon dioxide straight from the air is an immense challenge: Filtering it out requires moving a huge volume of air through a scrubber, which requires a lot of energy.

Nonetheless, there are companies that have already pulled this off. Carbon Engineering in Canada has built a plant that captures about 1 ton of carbon dioxide per day. Meanwhile Climeworks is running three direct air capture plants — in Iceland, Switzerland, and Italy — together capturing 1,100 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

What do you do with this carbon dioxide once you have it? Carbon engineering is working on an air to fuels pathway. In Iceland, Climeworks is turning its captured carbon dioxide into basalt rock, while in Switzerland the gas is used as a fertilizer in a greenhouse, and in Italy, the company is using the carbon dioxide to make methane fuel for trucks.

But right now, we’re only talking capture on the scale of hundreds of tons. Remember, the IPCC’s low-end estimate for the amount of carbon capture we need by 2100 is 100 gigatons. That’s 100,000,000,000 tons of carbon dioxide. So we would need more than 800,000 times our current annual direct air capture capacity by 2100 if we’re going to rely on this method alone to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Carbon dioxide removal is not a get out of jail free card for climate change
This is by no means an exhaustive list of carbon dioxide removal tactics. Scientists are also exploring how to extract carbon from the air with seawater as well as enhanced weathering of rocks so that they react with atmospheric carbon dioxide.

But getting governments and companies to invest in these technologies requires a price on carbon. Direct air capture, for example, would be especially useful for offsetting some of the hardest sectors to decarbonize, like air travel. However, companies estimate it costs about $100 per ton to withdraw carbon dioxide from the air, so a carbon price would have to be higher than that. Or the technology has to become much, much cheaper.

As noted above, there are commercial uses for captured carbon dioxide that can offset the price tag. Right now though, one of the most common uses for captured carbon dioxide is enhanced oil recovery. For example, the world’s largest carbon capture facility is at the Petra Nova coal plant in Texas. The captured carbon is sold to an oil producer to help extract more oil from a nearby well. Now, Petra Nova’s carbon dioxide is scrubbed from a flue, not directly from the air like direct air capture, but enhanced oil recovery was a key part of the business case for the plant.

So it’s capturing carbon dioxide and injecting it underground … to extract more carbon.

That means we need coordinated policies with climate change at the center to make carbon dioxide removal work to fight warming. In addition to pricing carbon, it would require pricing ecosystem services, research and development grants, and tax credits to encourage deployment of carbon dioxide removal.

And, as the National Academies points out, the heavy lifting will still come from accelerating the entire suite of low-emissions technology at the same time, from energy efficiency to renewables, as the chart below shows.

Only then will carbon removal truly start to have an impact in the fight against climate change.

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Traditional Cleaning Tricks That Don’t Actually Work

Cleaning experts are calling the bluff on these popular cleaning “hacks.” Removing gum with peanut butter Save the PB for your sandwiches and skip putting it on gum-matted hair or upholstery, says Melissa Maker, a cleaning expert and host of the YouTube channel Clean My Space. Not only does this hack waste food, but it […]

Cleaning experts are calling the bluff on these popular cleaning “hacks.”

Removing gum with peanut butter

Gum

Save the PB for your sandwiches and skip putting it on gum-matted hair or upholstery, says Melissa Maker, a cleaning expert and host of the YouTube channel Clean My Space. Not only does this hack waste food, but it will also create a bigger mess to clean up afterward. Maker recommends applying coconut or olive oil to the sticky area, instead.

Mixing baking soda and vinegar makes a super cleaner

bakingsoda

Don’t get us wrong—baking soda and vinegar are great cleaning products on their own. But mix them together, and you’re left with nothing but water. What gives? Because vinegar is an acid and baking soda is a base, together they will fizz up and neutralize each other. “People may think that the fizz helps to remove dirt or grime, but all it will do is create a big mess,” Maker says. Stick to these household vinegar uses you never knew about.

Soaking clothes in salt prevents fading

Woman hand washing clothes

Experts at Goodhousekeeping.com tested this trick and found that it’s bogus. Turns out, whether or not the dye bleeds actually depends on how the material was made. “If a fabric runs, it’s just not properly finished,” Carolyn Forte, the director of the Good Housekeeping Institute’s Cleaning Lab, says. So if the colors of your clothes are running in the washer, you should blame your wardrobe—not the water you wash it in.

Rubbing wax paper on baseboards prevents dust build-up

Moulding in the corner. Light matte wall with tiles immitating hardwood flooring

Wrong again! Wax paper leaves behind a sticky, chemical-loaded coating on your baseboards that is almost guaranteed to need a second clean. Even worse, it may attract more dust and dirt in the process. Maker suggests wiping your baseboards with a dry microfiber cloth, and you can even attach it to a flat-head mop or long pole for any hard-to-reach spots.

Spraying hairspray removes ink and marker stains

Woman hand

This trick worked back in the day when hairspray contained alcohol, the ingredient needed to remove pesky stains. But these days, you are better off applying rubbing alcohol to the offending spot, according to Leslie Reichert, author of The Joy of Green Cleaning. Dab the fabric with a stain remover and give it a spin in the washing machine to make sure the stain is gone for good.

Placing dryer sheets in the air vent freshens the house

Ceiling Vent

Dryer sheets belong in your laundry, not your air vents. “An HVAC system isn’t one you want to mess around with,” Maker says. Leaving dryer sheets in the vents can block airflow and spread synthetic chemicals throughout your home. Luckily, there are many more effective ways to make your home smell fresh. Maker suggests changing your furnace filter, deodorizing your soft surfaces, or using an essential oils diffuser.

Using wood polish spiffs up furniture

brown sofa cleaning

Polishing furniture made of raw wood is a no-brainer. But most wood furniture sold today is coated in a finish, so polishing it can actually make your furniture appear duller. Polyurethane, urethane, shellac, or varnish finishes are all made of plastic, which should be cleaned rather than polished, according to Jan M. Dougherty, author of The Lost Art of House Cleaning. She cleans her wood furniture with white vinegar and a microfiber rag.

Mixing vinegar and dish soap removes pet stains

macro shot of dish soap being squeezed onto green sponge in aluminum sink

Vinegar is a stain remover superhero, but it’s not strong enough to remove odors and discoloration caused by pet urine or vomit. Same goes for dish soap. An enzyme cleaner, on the other hand, is able to break down the proteins in the stain and make your carpet or upholstery look spotless.

Dusting shelves with a coffee filter

Receptacle for coffee filters

Using a coffee filter to dust your home seems like a cheap alternative for a store-bought duster. But Reichert, a.k.a. The Cleaning Coach, has one question for this hack: Why? “It doesn’t produce static and doesn’t attract dust,” she says. “It’s made to filter coffee!” Instead, opt for a vacuum with a nozzle attachment or a soft, damp cloth.

Washing grime off a car with dishwashing detergent

bubbles soap on car

While it’s true that you should clean your car with soap that fights off grease, dishwashing detergent is not the answer. This cleaning product is made to remove everything—including the polymers in your car’s paint, which speeds up its oxidation process. A proper car-wash cleaner is specifically designed to be used on automotive paint, so it will be much gentler on your vehicle.

Cleaning a chalkboard with soda

Close up arrangement of chalkboard. Preschool, education, back to school and copy-space concept or other your content.

Conventional wisdom says that soda will make a smudgy chalkboard look like new again. But according to Maker, the sugar in the soda actually clings to the chalkboard surface instead, leaving behind a sticky, nasty mess. To get rid of those pesky smudges, Maker suggests mixing equal parts vinegar and water, then spraying the board and wiping it with a microfiber cloth.

Applying white wine removes red wine stains

A toppled glass of red wine with a dirty carpet.

The next time you spill red wine all over your shirt, don’t pop open a bottle of the white stuff. First of all, why waste a good glass of wine? And truth be told, this hack just doesn’t work. Reichert recommends spraying a bit of hydrogen peroxide on the stain, instead.

Wiping windows with newspaper leaves fewer streaks

News - Pile of newspapers. Daily papers with articles and headlines stacked on the table. Actual information in press, fresh media. Folded tabloid pages on desk in office, data on paper. Side view

Odds are, your grandparents still clean their windows with newspapers, claiming it will leave the glass shiny and streak-free. However, “this worked years ago when the ink came off and formed a film on the window,” Reichert says. “[It] doesn’t work any longer.” Newspapers today are made out of materials that make them even less effective than paper towels. Rubbing alcohol or vinegar on a microfiber cloth is a more surefire way to get spotless windows, according to Dougherty.

Soaking a dryer sheet in a dirty pan unsticks food scraps

Dirty Pan with Tomato Sauce and Spoons. Dirty Dishes from the Cooking Process.

This popular hack is just an old wives’ tale. “Fabric softener is designed to soften synthetic clothing and reduce static, not lift food off a surface,” Maker says. In this case, patience is key; most residue can be removed from a dirty pan when left to soak overnight, according to Maker. Add some baking soda to the soapy water if you need to tackle any particularly stubborn spots.

Using toilet bowl cleaner removes shower grime

Douche, moldy

Running low on shower cleaning product? Don’t count on your toilet bowl cleaner to get the job done. Toilet cleaners contain acids and bleach products that can destroy the finish on your tubs and tiles, Maker says. You will be better off using a dedicated bathroom cleaning product to scrub soap scum off the shower.

The more product you use, the better the clean

Bucket with sponges, chemicals bottles, brushes, towel and rubber gloves. Household equipment, spring-cleaning, tidying up, cleaning service concept, copy space.Cleaning products. Home cleaning concep

Most people think that if using a little bit works well, then using more must work better. But that’s not the case with cleaning products. In fact, “when it comes to cleaning, less is often more,” Maker says. Applying too much product can actually backfire, leading to residue build-up and requiring more elbow grease to get it clean again. As a general rule of thumb, using a small amount of product and leaving it for a few minutes before wiping it down will usually do the trick. Steal these genius cleaning hacks from professional house cleaners, too.

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