How Often Should You Clean Your Couch Fabric?

How Often Should You Clean Your Couch Fabric?

Everyone’s living room couch needs a good cleaning every now and then, but this is doubly true if you have pets that like to lounge on your furniture. Our couches often weather a lot, from spills and pet hair to everyday wear and tear. If it’s been a while since you last cleaned your couch […]

Everyone’s living room couch needs a good cleaning every now and then, but this is doubly true if you have pets that like to lounge on your furniture. Our couches often weather a lot, from spills and pet hair to everyday wear and tear. If it’s been a while since you last cleaned your couch upholstery, you might be wondering if it’s time for a good clean.

WHY YOU NEED TO CLEAN YOUR COUCH FABRIC
It’s important to clean your couch fabric every so often because, just as your clothes do, your couch is liable to pick up a variety of contaminants. Food, dirt, dust and grime can get trapped in the woven threads of your sofa, leading them to harbor microbes and bacteria. In addition to looking unsightly, a dirty couch can smell and can even spread the growth of bacteria in your home.

HOW OFTEN TO CLEAN
So, how often should you clean your couch? TODAY recommends doing a deep clean at least once a year. You can, of course, go to a professional, but many professional upholstery cleaners use toxic cleaning products that fans of natural alternatives probably wouldn’t like.

Instead, I recommend vacuuming your couch once a week and cleaning the fabric itself at least every two weeks, if not more often. Because you’ll be using more natural methods, it’s important to stay on top of your cleaning schedule.

TIPS AND TRICKS
When you go to clean your sofa fabric, here’s what to do:

  • First, remove any washable fabric and throw it into the washing machine with your regular laundry detergent. Important: ONLY DO THIS if your couch fabric is machine washable. This should be clearly designated on the tag.
  • Next, any parts that can’t be washed in your machine or taken off of the couch should first be vacuumed, then cleaned. Running a vacuum cleaner over your fabric will pick up most pet hair and food particles. Be sure to vacuum under cushions and between pillows. If you have any lingering odors, sprinkle some backing soda over the couch and allow it to sit for at least a few hours before vacuuming it up.
  • Finally, it’s time to wipe down the fabric itself. As long as your sofa’s upholstery tag doesn’t say that it needs to stay completely dry, you’re good to go ahead and use a clean sponge to wipe it down.
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How to Get Rid of Dust and Make Your Home Shine

The first step when it comes to dusting is knowing which tools you should and shouldn’t use. For instance, feather dusters are far from helpful, according to Carolyn Forte, director of the Good Housekeeping Institute Cleaning Lab: “This tool simply spreads dust from one surface to another.” Instead, you can more successfully capture dust with a soft cloth dampened […]

The first step when it comes to dusting is knowing which tools you should and shouldn’t use. For instance, feather dusters are far from helpful, according to Carolyn Forte, director of the Good Housekeeping Institute Cleaning Lab: “This tool simply spreads dust from one surface to another.” Instead, you can more successfully capture dust with a soft cloth dampened with water, a microfiber duster, or an electrostatic duster. Now that you have your tools, here are targeted strategies for your home’s most hard-to-reach spots.

Walls

For ceiling-to-floor cleaning, a vacuum with multiple attachments is the most efficient tool. Work from the top down to capture the most dust without making a mess.

Baseboards

You can tackle dingy spots using a wet cloth. Lightly spray it with water or an all-purpose cleaning solution, like Lysol All-Purpose Cleaner Trigger ($7, amazon.com) and run it over baseboards to whisk debris away in a flash.

Curio cabinets

To get at dust trapped in tiny nooks and intricate carvings, use a clean natural-bristle paint or makeup brush, then wipe with a microfiber cloth ($5 for 3, amazon.com).

Electronics

Computers, TVs, DVD players, stereos, and printers are notorious dust magnets. Always unplug the equipment before cleaning. A gentle swipe with a microfiber clothusually does the job, while a soft, long-handled brush ($3, amazon.com) will collect dust from crevices. Be sure to vacuum dust from around cords and vents because, along with pet hair, it can clog machines or outlets.

how to dust

Soft toys

Put beanbag critters, teddy bears, or fabric dolls into a large plastic bag with a cup of baking soda. Secure the top, then take the items outside and shake well. The baking soda and static will draw out the soil and dust. Remove items one at a time, shake off the clumps of baking soda, and vacuum the rest using a brush attachment.

Behind appliances

Over time, crumbs, grease, and other debris accumulate behind your stove and refrigerator, providing a food source for insects and other pests. If possible, move the appliance out from the wall and unplug. Use a long-handled, slightly damp sponge mop ($12, amazon.com) to lift dust from the back of the appliance, then wipe floor and walls with hot soapy water.

Vents

Remove heavy dust from ceiling, floor, or appliance vents with a soft-brush vacuum attachment or electrostatic mop ($16, amazon.com), then dampen a microfiber clothand wipe the surface. Rinse removable, washable air-conditioning filters well in hot soapy water and air-dry before reinstalling.

Ceiling fans

Place newspaper or a drop cloth under the ceiling fan. Turn off the power source, then get on a step stool. Use damp paper towels to wipe greasy dust from the casing and a soft-bristle brush dampened with a mild cleanser, like Dawn Ultra Dishwashing Liquid Dish Soap ($2, amazon.com) to loosen the dust on the blades, then rinse with a damp paper towel.

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How to Clean and Maintain Laminate Floors

There’s a reason just about every designer on popular home TV shows ends up installing laminate floors. It’s made out of wood composite (materials like sawdust pressed together), but looks just like solid hardwood flooring. Plus, it’s often cheaper, easier to install, and (wait for it) comes with a clear protective layer on top. But […]

There’s a reason just about every designer on popular home TV shows ends up installing laminate floors. It’s made out of wood composite (materials like sawdust pressed together), but looks just like solid hardwood flooring. Plus, it’s often cheaper, easier to install, and (wait for it) comes with a clear protective layer on top. But it still requires regular care.

First, Carolyn Forte, director of the Good Housekeeping Institute Cleaning Lab, says to stock up on these essentials:

  • Bissell Zing Bagged Canister Vacuum ($50, amazon.com)
  • Microfiber mop ($40, amazon.com)
  • Weiman Hardwood Floor Cleaner ($10 per bottle, amazon.com)

Got it? Now learn how to use these products:

How to Clean Laminate Floors

1. Regularly run a canister vacuum, like the Bissell Zing Bagged Canister Vacuum, over the surface to remove dirt and debris from cracks and crevices. “If you only have an upright model, turn off the rotating brush to keep the bristles from scratching your floors,” says Forte. Work your way around the floor, cleaning one area at a time.

2. Every one to two months damp-mop the floor for a more thorough cleaning, using a specialty cleaner, like Good Housekeeping Seal holder Weiman Hardwood Floor Cleaner. Pro tip: Keep the mop damp, not wet, so you don’t oversaturate the floor.

3. To prevent damage, do not polish or wax a laminate floor. Also, don’t use abrasive cleaners, scouring powder, or steel wool. They have the potential to scratch the floor and damage the protective finish.

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Woman Spends 3 Years Converting Old Bus Into Mobile Home, And It Looks Better Than Most Apartments

Instead of searching for her dream home, Jessie Lipskin decided to create it. Scrolling through eBay, Jessie fell in love with a 1966 GMC bus (the same model Keanu Reeves Drove On ‘Speed’) and instantly bought it. She spent the next few years converting the vehicle into a house on wheels, and the gorgeous results […]

Instead of searching for her dream home, Jessie Lipskin decided to create it. Scrolling through eBay, Jessie fell in love with a 1966 GMC bus (the same model Keanu Reeves Drove On ‘Speed’) and instantly bought it. She spent the next few years converting the vehicle into a house on wheels, and the gorgeous results display all the effort she put in the project. Jessie explains that her nontraditional home was inspired by the pursuit of an eco-friendly lifestyle.

“My first draw to the alternative sustainable lifestyle was the documentary Garbage Warrior,” Lipskin told. In the documentary Michael Reynolds, an eco-architect, designs and builds earthships using all-recycled materials. “[It] really resonated with me. I began to consume everything I could read, more about sustainable lifestyles. Ultimately, a home on wheels seemed like a perfect solution: I could easily explore new places (finding a permanent place to settle, in the short term, was not a priority for me), and I could continue to live a vegan lifestyle.”

“RVs lacked the aesthetic I was going for, so I landed on a vintage bus conversion which could be registered and insured as an RV.”

Jessie said that the hardest part was finding the right people to help her complete the conversion. “I love DIY, however, I don’t have experience with plumbing, electrical, carpentry needed for this project,” she added. “The big challenge was that it was very different from working on a home that’s fixed in one location. I constantly had to account for movement, on top of that the angles of the bus and slanted style windows made it challenging to design the best possible layout and curved woodworking. Levels were useless as the bus incline changes depending on location, it was all about calculating angles. This added a lot of time onto the project.”

Despite the hardships, she didn’t give up. Overall, her labor of love took a little over $70k to complete. Jessie has been living in the bus since January, and she absolutely adores it.

Jessie Lipskin fell in love with this 1966 GMC bus and decided she would turn it into a cute mobile home

This is how the bus looked like when she bought it

old-bus-redesigned-mobile-home-jessie-lipskin-33
The hardest part was finding the right people to help her complete the conversion

“I love DIY, however, I don’t have experience with plumbing, electrical, carpentry needed for this project,” she told Bored Panda

“The big challenge was that it was very different from working on a home that’s fixed in one location”

“I constantly had to account for movement, on top of that the angles of the bus and slanted style windows made it challenging to design the best possible layout and curved woodworking”

“Levels were useless as the bus incline changes depending on location, it was all about calculating angles. This added a lot of time onto the project”

Overall, the bus took 3 years to redo

The result is so much worth it, though:

“An oil painting found at Goodwill adorns the hallway. I think these finishing touches really help it feel more like a home than a bus,” a helpful friend wrote

“View from the kitchen area towards the main bedroom”

“Took a good amount of searching to find the right curtains. Went with velvet curtains in the bedroom”

“A custom-made bench cushion from Final Cut in New Jersey”

“A little “library” along the back of the bedroom”

“This is just one portion of the closet, it extends to the left and right a decent amount”

“Went with the IGLOO (33 in. W 5.5 cu. ft.) Side by Side Refrigerator in Silver, Counter Depth from Home Depot. It’s a fridge/freezer”

“The bathroom has mahogany wood slotted flooring that drains for drying off post shower. The shower drain connects to the floor drain and they both lead to the gray water tank which is mounted under the bus”

“A kitchen with a view”

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Care Turned This Werewolf Into A Beautiful Dog

For several months, a mysterious animal stood by the side of a road in Madera Ranchos, California. He was skinny and balding, with scaly, hard skin and a broken tail. This terrifying appearance caused people to call him the werewolf. Because of his scary and dangerous look, it took a while before anyone dared approaching […]

For several months, a mysterious animal stood by the side of a road in Madera Ranchos, California. He was skinny and balding, with scaly, hard skin and a broken tail. This terrifying appearance caused people to call him the werewolf.

werewolf
Because of his scary and dangerous look, it took a while before anyone dared approaching him. In fact, it only happened when a passerby, after seeing him, decided to post a photo on Facebook asking for help. That was when Megan Bowe, founder of Bowe’s Adoptable Rescued Pups, showed up.

The rescue
Bowe told The Dodo,“I was about ready to cry when I saw how bad off he was. He was really on his last leg. He was depressed and could barely even stand up.”

She realized the so-called “werewolf” was really just a sick and neglected German shepherd mix and decided to drive him to an emergency veterinary clinic immediately. And, much to her surprise, not only did the dog not resist her attempt to put him in her car, but he almost seemed relieved to finally get help.

At the clinic, Megan heard from the veterinarian that King (the name she decided to give to the dog) suffered from several diseases and injuries including a broken pelvis and a broken tail. She also learned that, although he looked much older, King was only a year old.

shepard

“My vet thinks he got hit by a car, and that would explain how his tail was so messed up, too,” she said. “That injury happened months ago, because by the time I got him it had already started to heal incorrectly. And with such a damaged pelvis, he wasn’t able to get around very far on his own to look for food, so he was extremely skinny and dehydrated.”

A chance to recover
Megan took him to her house and set up a quarantine area in her garage so her other animals would not be infected by King’s contagious diseases. He needed to gain some weight before he could have surgery to fix his pelvis and tail, so she helped him by giving him small portions of food and gradually increasing them as he got stronger.

Shepard mix

Following the vet’s orders, King now goes for daily walks to strengthen his legs while he waits patiently for when he can have his stitches removed. Once he is fully recovered, Megan Bowe says he is going to be available for adoption. Hopefully, he will soon have the happy home and family he deserves.

 

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Housekeepers Reveal the Best House Cleaning Tips You’re Probably Not Doing

Wish you could get your house as clean as it feels right after a cleaning crew comes through? You can by following these tips! Read on to learn about the best house cleaning tips from housekeepers. 1. Use a cleaning caddy This a true trick of the trade for housekeepers. It’s much easier to clean […]
Wish you could get your house as clean as it feels right after a cleaning crew comes through? You can by following these tips! Read on to learn about the best house cleaning tips from housekeepers.

1. Use a cleaning caddy

This a true trick of the trade for housekeepers. It’s much easier to clean each room when you can carry all of your supplies with you. Instead of spreading out your cleaning supplies in different areas of the house, keep everything together in one cleaning caddy that you can easily transport from room to room.

2. Don’t buy different products for every cleaning task

You don’t need to buy a different product for every different surface in your home–that’s a waste of money. Save space in your cleaning caddy by using all-purpose products that are used by the pros.

“Look for a disinfecting all-purpose cleaner that also cleans glass, a disinfecting cleaner that works on tough spots in the kitchen and bathroom, and a floor cleaner that works on wood and tile,” advises the housekeepers at Care.

3. Declutter before you do anything else

Cleaning around your clutter is never the way to go. Get your home organized and take care of the clutter before you start the real cleaning. Care suggests having your kids help you out by putting away all their toys and clothes while you put away all the junk (like magazines, tablets, etc.) that’s piled up in the common areas.

4. Every housekeeper uses these tools

Similarly to the cleaning products, less is more. You don’t need a different specialty tool for every little different cleaning task in your home. According to Care, housekeepers always use these tools: microfiber cleaning cloths, sponges, a handle and detail scrub brush, a vacuum that works on floor and carpets, a duster, and a mop.

5. Even if you think you are, you’re not dusting everything you should be

You need to be dusting a lot more than just the surfaces of countertops, bookshelves, desks, and tables. Don’t forget to look up when you’re dusting. Things like ceiling fans, light fixtures, the tops of tall furniture, electronics and the backs of TVs and computers all attract lots of dust but are often neglected.

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